What is your OS?

mYusufSulemanmYusufSuleman Posts: 41Member

What is your OS?
Mine is Ubuntu, will switch to Arch.


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  • cyberealitycybereality Posts: 5,318Moderator

    I use Ubuntu now, have for about 3 years. I also have a second computer with Windows 11 I use mostly for testing.

  • DaveTheCoderDaveTheCoder Posts: 881Member

    Pop!_OS, which is based on Ubuntu. It's not necessarily better than Ubuntu, but it's developed and maintained by the company from which I bought my computer.

  • cyberealitycybereality Posts: 5,318Moderator

    I never tried Arch, but I used Manjaro for a few months and I liked it. It was really good out-of-box, similar to Ubuntu, but also had a lot of newer apps. However, I am more comfortable with Ubuntu since I have been using it longer. Been on it straight for about 3 years, but I dual booted Ubuntu/Windows 10 for about 3 years before that. So I'm kind of invested at this point.

  • DaveTheCoderDaveTheCoder Posts: 881Member

    I experimented with Arch some time ago in a virtual machine, but never got it working properly. There's a do-it-yourself aspect to it which would take more time and effort than I'm interested in.

  • cyberealitycybereality Posts: 5,318Moderator

    Yeah, it's a bit too much for me too. That is why I tried Manjaro, cause it is the Ubuntu version of Arch.

  • some_lame_kidsome_lame_kid Posts: 179Member

    I used Manjaro for about a year before switching to Arch. Steep learning curve but it can be worth it when it gets you intimately familiar with the file system. If you really feel like getting dirty, you get a cool desktop too.

  • cyberealitycybereality Posts: 5,318Moderator

    I mean, I use the Arch wiki for a lot of stuff. Most of those tips also work on Ubuntu (or any Linux distro).

  • some_lame_kidsome_lame_kid Posts: 179Member

    I forgot to mention, of course Arch is extremely lightweight. Very productive OS once you learn how to use it. Depending on your hardware, workflow improves by a ton. Just be careful about hardware compatibility. Especially when you're working with a team. In fact if a team is involved, don't bother. I promise you it's not worth it.

  • TomcatTomcat Posts: 74Member

    I have been using Win 7 for a long time, starting with the pre-release version. My target audience is still using Win 7 extensively. Was going to get a new computer that would support both Win 7 and 11 for a smooth transition and getting used to it. But politics intervened and to be able to quickly evacuate the country, I took a laptop-tablet running Win 11 so as not to be left without a working tool.

    I would have to switch to a new operating system anyway — importing scenes into Godot 4 requires the presence of Blender 3, and it runs only on Win 11. Blender 2.93 can be made to run on Win 7, but I couldn't get Blender 3 to work.

    Win 11 was not as terrible as 10, although not as comfortable as 7.

  • some_lame_kidsome_lame_kid Posts: 179Member

    I used to use Windows 7 for messing around, but I think I broke something installing XP on another hard drive. The PC now only boots into the HDD running XP and nothing else. I go to the boot menu, specifically pick another hard drive or USB or the CD-ROM, and it boots into XP. No clue what's up with that, but I don't mind. I use it to look at the visualizers and play old PC games. Actual work is done in Arch.

  • TomcatTomcat Posts: 74Member

    @some_lame_kid said:
    I used to use Windows 7 for messing around, but I think I broke something installing XP on another hard drive. The PC now only boots into the HDD running XP and nothing else. I go to the boot menu, specifically pick another hard drive or USB or the CD-ROM, and it boots into XP.

    What if you unplug the XP drive? Win 7 has a virtual XP and it works quite decently.

  • some_lame_kidsome_lame_kid Posts: 179Member

    I did that, Windows 7 files are all there but it doesn't boot. It all sounds like I busted a bootloader or something but I can't be bothered to fix it. For now.

  • cyberealitycybereality Posts: 5,318Moderator

    Why would you want Windows 7? People are so attached to the past. Move on.

  • TomcatTomcat Posts: 74Member
    edited May 11

    @some_lame_kid said:
    I did that, Windows 7 files are all there but it doesn't boot. It all sounds like I busted a bootloader or something but I can't be bothered to fix it. For now.

    I had a very similar situation when I installed a preview version of Win 10 — then I put them on the same drive. Somehow I managed to restore the Win 7 boot… but due to the long time ago, unfortunately, I can't remember exactly how. I think Win has an automatic restore (Startup Repair Tool)…

    @cybereality said:
    Why would you want Windows 7?

    Windows 7 — Forever :D There are still a lot of people using it. The game should run on Win 7 if you want to reach a large audience. Stability, reliability, convenience... new systems are a long way from the tried and tested old guy.

    For example I have an old but good scanner that only works under XP, and it can be run via virtual in Win 7.

  • duaneduane Posts: 271Member

    I put ubuntu on one of my computers around the turn of the century, and liked it so much that I deleted all of my windows installations within a month. Then I gritted my teeth every time I had to use windows at work.

    A few years later, I tried Gentoo because everyone said, "Gentoo is just for elites! It's way too much for you to handle."

    Needless to say, that wasn't true. Gentoo is easy, as long as you can follow instructions, and my gentoo server runs at least 10% faster* than any binary distribution, including clearlinux. I strongly recommend it for anyone who wants a fast, custom system.

    Having said that, I've run Archlinux a lot over the last two decades as well. It's fun to play with, but if you want real speed, you'll have to recompile several packages every time you update. If you're going to do that, it's easier to use Gentoo anyway.

    Note that the Gentoo developers do not encourage anyone to use it based on speed. That's because they give you all the tools you need to shoot yourself in the foot -- with regard to speed or any other property. But, as I say, if you can follow instructions, that won't be an issue.

    * My server does a lot of things, but the most cpu-intensive function is trancoding video, which has run 24/7 for over a year now. (I have a lot of discs to encode.) 10% speed increase makes a big difference in a long project.

  • cyberealitycybereality Posts: 5,318Moderator
    edited May 12

    @Tomcat said:
    The game should run on Win 7 if you want to reach a large audience.

    Well, people running Win 7 are likely pirates with such an old video card they can't even run my game anyhow.

  • TomcatTomcat Posts: 74Member
    edited May 12

    @duane said:
    I put ubuntu on one of my computers around the turn of the century

    When I built a new computer, I wanted to try Linux, but it turned out that there were no drivers — the hardware was too new. That was the end of my introduction to Linux.

    @cybereality said:

    Well, people running Win 7 are likely pirates with such an old video card they can't even run my game anyhow.

    The latest drivers for Win 7 are from NVIDIA for RTX 30. I did not notice any correlation between piracy and installed operating systems, and I am a moderator on a gaming site. All I know is that installing a pirated Win 10 or 11 is no big deal.

    Never ask a woman about her age and a Russian if he has licensed software. :)

  • TwistedTwiglegTwistedTwigleg Posts: 5,344Admin

    Somehow I completely skipped Windows 7. Went from Windows XP to Visa, then from Visa straight to Windows 8…
    It seems okay though. The thing I’d worry about now with Windows 7 is security, since I do not think it is getting security updates anymore right?

    Now I have Windows 10 and Ubuntu Linux dual booted on my dev machine :+1:

  • duaneduane Posts: 271Member

    @Tomcat said:
    When I built a new computer, I wanted to try Linux, but it turned out that there were no drivers — the hardware was too new.

    You definitely want to check your hardware for compatibility, but I haven't managed to find any hardware that didn't have drivers in the last ten years. Maybe I just didn't look hard enough.

  • TomcatTomcat Posts: 74Member

    @TwistedTwigleg said:
    Somehow I completely skipped Windows 7. Went from Windows XP to Visa, then from Visa straight to Windows 8…

    I skipped Win 8, 10 and moved from 7 to 11 the same way.

    It seems okay though. The thing I’d worry about now with Windows 7 is security, since I do not think it is getting security updates anymore right?

    The personal version doesn't get updates, but with normal antivirus and minimal hygiene it's not a problem.

  • some_lame_kidsome_lame_kid Posts: 179Member
    edited May 12

    I never had a problem with viruses when I used Windows 7 either. And if we're talking about skipping OS, I went from Windows XP to Windows 98 to Mac OS 8, then I decided I wanted an actual childhood for a bit. I came back just in time to experience Windows 8.1.

    From a very, very young age, I had a bad habit of breaking operating systems.

  • AudiobellumAudiobellum Posts: 175Member

    Windows 10 Pro.

  • TomcatTomcat Posts: 74Member

    @duane said:

    You definitely want to check your hardware for compatibility, but I haven't managed to find any hardware that didn't have drivers in the last ten years. Maybe I just didn't look hard enough.

    It was at the very end of 2008… a little over 10 years ago. LGA1366 processors had just appeared and I immediately got one. As far as I remember (and if I'm not mistaken, and it's a long time ago), it seems that Linux didn't support booting from SATA yet. Maybe they did it later, but as we say "a little bit of a sore spot left on my mind".

  • MegalomaniakMegalomaniak Posts: 4,803Admin

    @Tomcat said:
    Blender 2.93 can be made to run on Win 7, but I couldn't get Blender 3 to work.

    https://github.com/nalexandru/BlenderCompat/releases

  • cyberealitycybereality Posts: 5,318Moderator

    Windows 7 has several pretty huge security holes that make your PC wide open. It's honestly reckless to run it (some can be injected by malicious ads, without you even clicking anything, or remotely). It's like going to a party where everyone has COVID and not wearing a mask, or doing something else that's inappropriate to talk about on the forum.

  • duaneduane Posts: 271Member

    Theoretically, you can run less secure software safely, if you pay attention and know what you're doing. However, one lapse at the wrong time, and you're scrambling for backups, and hoping no one (including you) managed to sabotage your backup process. [You do have a backup process, right?]

    Of course, if all you ever do on your windows 7 machine is play games, it's not so much of an issue. We have a name for over-emphasizing security where it's not necessary -- it's called "bad security". :)

  • cyberealitycybereality Posts: 5,318Moderator

    @duane said:
    Theoretically, you can run less secure software safely, if you pay attention and know what you're doing.

    Theoretically, you can jump out a plane and fall 2 miles and live (it's happened) but I wouldn't suggest it.

  • TomcatTomcat Posts: 74Member
    edited May 12

    @duane said:
    Of course, if all you ever do on your windows 7 machine is play games, it's not so much of an issue.

    Our whole life is a game. Creating games and programming is also a game.

    @cybereality said:
    Windows […] has several pretty huge security holes that make your PC wide open. It's honestly reckless to run it (some can be injected by malicious ads, without you even clicking anything, or remotely). It's like going to a party where everyone has COVID and not wearing a mask, or doing something else that's inappropriate to talk about on the forum.

    This can be said about any version of Windows. =)

  • duaneduane Posts: 271Member
    edited May 13

    @Tomcat said:
    Our whole life is a game. Creating games and programming is also a game.

    I used to tell everyone that I didn't need to play games -- when you use linux, the operating system is a game.

    And, I had a t-shirt printed that said, "Making games is more fun than playing them." :)

    In fact, I still have the graphic...

  • cyberealitycybereality Posts: 5,318Moderator

    Making games is another type of game.

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