Godot Somewhat Working on ARM Chromebook

cyberealitycybereality Posts: 2,780Moderator

I got the Godot Engine somewhat working on a $250 ARM Chromebook (Lenovo Duet). I used the software Box64 to run the Standard Linux 64-bit version of Godot on ChromeOS using the Linux container. There are lots of issues, but I was surprised it even worked at all.

Only OpenGL ES 2.0 is supported, the ChromeOS Mesa drivers don't seem to support OpenGL ES 3.0, at least on this particular device. The project manager will launch, but won't be able to open projects. You need to use the command-line to launch the project folder directly. You can launch the editor like this:

box64 Godot_v3.4-stable_x11.64 --video-driver GLES2 --path Path/To/Project --editor

In the Project Settings, look in Debug Run and set the command to:

box64 %command%

This will allow you to play in the editor and have it launch via Box64.

Lots of stuff is broken though, and I wouldn't recommend using it unless just to experiment.

Comments

  • epicspacesepicspaces Posts: 113Member

    cybereality, bah ... you, euh, ... me, I would love to say, I'm ... well, so what should I say, I ... let's keep moving

  • CalinouCalinou Posts: 1,057Admin Godot Developer
    edited November 24

    It's possible to build Godot for 64-bit ARM Linux – you don't have to use Box64 emulation. No official binaries are provided yet, but it's planned.

  • jbskaggsjbskaggs Posts: 222Member

    I went down the Chrome OS rabbit hole a while back as I had used Linux for ages and thought how hard would it be? After a bit I just decided to give up on chrome books and stick with my standard laptop and desktop linux and win systems. My problem was the chrome book I owned would not allow OS modifications etc.

    Good luck though.

  • cyberealitycybereality Posts: 2,780Moderator

    Yeah, I could never run a Chromebook as my main computer. Even with the Linux support, it is pretty locked down and many things don't work (changing swap, adding PPAs, GPU support is iffy, etc.). But for general web browsing and watching YouTube, etc. it actually works quite good. I am even able to play AAA games using Stadia up to 1080p 60 fps (though there is a bug on this machine that caps some games at 720p). But I imagine for a lot of people, it's a decent option. Especially if you are in high school or college and broke, a $250 computer is pretty attractive.

    This is the one I have, the Lenovo Chromebook Duet.
    https://www.amazon.com/Lenovo-Chromebook-MediaTek-Integrated-ZA6F0031US/dp/B08F4JRXFZ/

    It's a 2-in-1 and comes with the keyboard and stand. The screen is 1200p and very crisp. Touch screen works well. You can easily remove the keyboard and use it as a tablet, and it's not that heavy. So it's very versatile, great for watching Netflix, or using on a plane, a light machine to take with you to a coffee shop when you don't need to do serious work, etc. I got mine at Best Buy for $250, but the price fluctuates between around $200 to $300. Even so, this is a great deal for something for general web browsing use, and also gaming with Stadia. I'm just trying to see if you could actually do work on it. I know it's going to be rough, but for $250 that would be pretty cool to be able to develop games on the go.

  • jbskaggsjbskaggs Posts: 222Member

    If pressure sensitive pens worked with mine it would have been handy.

    Actually all of what you said is pretty true for my experience save Stadia. I have it but have never used it.

  • cyberealitycybereality Posts: 2,780Moderator

    I agree. This is my real laptop, the Lenovo Flex 5. I got it for $700, has a decent AMD chip and a touchscreen, comes with the pen and is pressure sensitive. Actually, the pen is just as good as Wacom, great for making art. And while the GPU is not that fast, I was able to use ZBrush and Unreal Engine (though Unreal would chug at full screen, the editor would work if you made the viewport window smaller). Apps like Photoshop, GIMP, Krita, etc. all worked perfectly and supported the pen. Probably the best deal for something like this.
    https://www.amazon.com/Lenovo-Processor-Graphics-Included-81X20005US/dp/B086226DDB/

    Stadia is a lot better than people think. Most games run at 1080p 60 fps and if you pay for pro you can unlock 4K support (though not all games are full 4K or 60 fps, depending on the game). There is slight latency, but if you use the Stadia controller it is pretty good still and playable. Not as good as PC, but I would say not much worse than a console system. You can play on all sorts of devices, even your phone, or on Mac and Linux where the games don't have native ports. They have a large library, and big games like Far Cry 6 or Resident Evil 8 come out on day one. Though since I have a good gaming PC, I don't use it as my primary system. I have it hooked up on a projector and I also like to test it on lower end or low spec systems that can't game natively. Again, though, for people that can't afford a $2,000 PC (and even if you have the money, PC parts are hard to get right now) or the cost of a console (which are also hard to get) you can get Stadia for like $50 for the controller and play with quality that is about a GTX 1070 level machine. So not a bad deal.

  • jbskaggsjbskaggs Posts: 222Member

    Hmmm I never had the internet speed to use it before. Maybe that Im in Salt Lake city tat maybe different now.

  • cyberealitycybereality Posts: 2,780Moderator

    @Calinou Do you have any advice for cross-compiling for ARM on a Linux machine? I tried to compile on the Chromebook itself, it took 5 hours and then failed to link at the end (some problem with the gamepad library).

  • cyberealitycybereality Posts: 2,780Moderator

    @jbskaggs said:
    Hmmm I never had the internet speed to use it before. Maybe that Im in Salt Lake city tat maybe different now.

    Here's a video I made of Cyberpunk 2077. This was on my normal machine since I can run at 4K and the Chromebook can only output at 720p to an external monitor.

  • MegalomaniakMegalomaniak Posts: 4,212Admin

    @cybereality said:
    Actually, the pen is just as good as Wacom, great for making art.

    It may quite possibly be a wacom digitizer and stylus pen. They do license it out to OEMs.

  • jbskaggsjbskaggs Posts: 222Member

    @cybereality What are the advantages to using stadia on a regular computer?

  • cyberealitycybereality Posts: 2,780Moderator

    @jbskaggs said:
    @cybereality What are the advantages to using stadia on a regular computer?

    Well if you have a high-end PC, not much. The native experience is going to be better, less lag, crisper images, etc. if you have a good GPU. However, if you have an older computer, or a laptop with integrated graphics, then Stadia will be better as you can go to 4K even on cheap crappy computers. You can also use on your phone or tablet, and it's cross platform, so you can run on Mac or Linux without using translation software (meaning you don't have to worry about bugs or compatibility problems). It also works with the Chromecast and Google TV (built-in on some newer 4K TVs) meaning you can play on your TV or projector without expensive hardware and it makes the experience very easy (unlike trying to use a PC on your TV). So I would say it doesn't replace a good computer, but it could take a place of a console system or be used on a streaming device, like Google TV, to also play games in addition to Netflix or whatever. So for that use case I think it works well.

  • jbskaggsjbskaggs Posts: 222Member

    Wow- I just tested it with a demo of the village and I was shocked that it ran so well streamed over my internet.

    Not much worse than normal play.

  • cyberealitycybereality Posts: 2,780Moderator

    I made a new video with more Stadia games.

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