General questions regarding the use of Godot for commercial projects

AlequeAleque Posts: 2Member
edited April 7 in General Chat

Hello everyone

I am relatively new to game development and I have very little experience with programming.
I'm considering to start using Godot to make games, but I'm not sure if it's the right engine for me. I'm having a hard time finding a successful game that is made in Godot, and this makes me doubt my decision of whether I should be learning Godot or not. By successful I mean a rather unique game that is popular and is selling pretty well on various platforms. Like: Limbo, Angry Birds, Among Us, Minecraft, Stardew Valley.

My current idea for a project is this. I would like to make a 2D game and I want to start relatively simple. The goal is to create a mix of: Point and click adventure, (action?) RPG, survival, puzzle.

I have a few questions about Godot.

1). Which limitations would you say Godot has compared to other engines?

My main worries with Godot are (and these are just thoughts based on ignorance and prejudice):

  • It's not mainstream enough.
  • It's not powerful enough and probably has too many limitations compared to, let's say, Unity.
  • It's not good enough to make a game that can become popular and give a significant profit

2). Would you say I am wrong about these worries? Please feel free to prove me wrong.

Let's say I create a simple game in Godot and it starts to gain popularity.

3). Would it be hard for me to make this game available on various platforms (compared to say, Unity) like mobile devices, consoles, Steam, GOG, etc.?

4). And also, regarding Godot being open source: If I am aiming for commercial success of a game, will it be harder for me to retain the rights of this game when Godot is open source? Especially in regard to whether someone would be able to "steal" my code and use it for their own game against my own will. Or even steal my game and sell it as their own.

I'm perfectly aware that piracy will always be there no matter what, and in some cases it might even be beneficial. So I guess I could take it as a compliment if someone tries to pirate my game. But still, there are bills to be paid and expenses to be covered. So passion is one thing, ofcourse but unfortunately in this realistic world we're living in one has to think about rules, money, etc.

I know this might seem silly, shooting for the stars when I haven't even created my first game yet. But on the other hand I want to feel prepared and motivated to use Godot. Prepared to face those aforementioned challenges and to eliminate confusions. And not worry about little things.

And I don't want to sound too greedy and capitalistic. I'm aware that the idea of Godot is being free, open-source and available to everyone. But there's just this little voice inside of me that makes me doubt and worry about: What if I do strike gold with an idea of a game, and this game will become more and more popular. Will I regret creating that game in Godot compared to other game engines. But specifically, why would I regret it, in this case.

Thank you for reading my topic.

Comments

  • TwistedTwiglegTwistedTwigleg Posts: 4,201Admin
    edited April 7

    Welcome to the forums @Aleque!

    1). Which limitations would you say Godot has compared to other engines?

    I'd say it really depends on what you are trying to do and what type of project(s) you want to create. Godot does have some limitations, generally with 3D performance (though Godot 4.0 is improving this dramatically), but for the most part I haven't ran into anything where I couldn't overcome it through some means.

    In my opinion, Godot's biggest limitation currently is that there is the occasional bug in releases in something semi-obscure that goes undetected. This can cause something working to suddenly break in a future release, which can be frustrating at times. That said, other game engines suffer from this too, so its not really Godot specific.

    GDScript is also a bit slower than the primary programming languages offered in other game engines, but C# support and GDNative work around this limitation nicely. For the most part though, even GDScript being sower isn't much of an issue in the majority of projects I have worked on.

    To answer the concerns you brought up directly:

    • It's not mainstream enough.

    Well, this is a bit of a chicken and the egg problem, as Godot cannot become mainstream without users using it, but if they do not use it because it is not mainstream then they cannot become mainstream :smile:

    But in all seriousness, you are correct that Godot isn't as popular or recognizable as some of the big name game engines out there. Godot is gaining popularity at a rapid pace though! Additionally, more and more indie studios are using Godot as their game engine of choice, and Godot games are starting to appear more frequently.

    • It's not powerful enough and probably has too many limitations compared to, let's say, Unity.

    Depends on what you mean by "powerful enough" and what aspects of Unity you are comparing it to. I used Unity for several years before migrating primarily to Godot, and for the most part anything one can do the other can too, it may just take some additional effort.

    One thing I should mention is that Godot does generally require a bit more work to get certain things commonly done in Unity working, but there are other things (like Kinematic characters) that Godot makes way easier than Unity. I find that working with Godot is a bit more low level, but it also allows for greater control and flexibility.

    • It's not good enough to make a game that can become popular and give a significant profit

    Godot, Unity, Unreal, etc are all just tools, you theoretically make any game in any of them with enough time, patience, and determination. As for getting popular, its generally seems to be luck based rather than a limitation (or lack thereof) in the game engine the game was made in.

    For profit, I cannot say right off, but I imagine it is similar to popularity: the tool probably doesn't influence the sales of the game directly, and therefore doesn't have much of an impact on profit.
    That said, this is not counting development time/effort. Like any tool though, you want to use the one you think is best for the project in question!

  • TwistedTwiglegTwistedTwigleg Posts: 4,201Admin
    edited April 7

    @Aleque said:
    2). Would you say I am wrong about these worries? Please feel free to prove me wrong.

    A lot of the concerns above really depends on your projects, needs, and experience, and even if it didn't, it doesn't matter what I think! What matters is what you think is the best tool for you.

    Let's say I create a simple game in Godot and it starts to gain popularity.

    3). Would it be hard for me to make this game available on various platforms (compared to say, Unity) like mobile devices, consoles, Steam, GOG, etc.?

    Godot supports exporting to all major desktop operating systems (Windows, MacOS, Linux) and mobile platforms (Android, iOS) out of the box and with minimal setup.

    Releasing on Steam, Epic Game Store, Itch.io, Gamejolt, GOG, etc is totally doable, as Godot supports all major desktop platforms. It should be as easy as exporting the binary from the Godot editor for the platform of your choosing, and then uploading it to the store.
    For iOS and Android, you need to have a bit more setup so you can build the app. Android requires having the Android SDK stuff, while iOS requires a Mac computer as you need Xcode. After that though, the generated app should be able to be uploaded to the app stores.

    Finally, for consoles its a bit different. Because Godot is open source, they cannot officially support consoles due to their closed nature and NDAs. However, many Godot games have been ported to consoles (primary the Switch from what I have seen) through third party providers who have working Godot export templates for console platforms, so its totally doable.

    4). And also, regarding Godot being open source: If I am aiming for commercial success of a game, will it be harder for me to retain the rights of this game when Godot is open source? Especially in regard to whether someone would be able to "steal" my code and use it for their own game against my own will. Or even steal my game and sell it as their own.

    Godot being open source shouldn't affect your ability to retain the rights to your game, nor do I think it would have an impact on the commercial success of your game.

    The concerns about someone stealing your game or game content would be an issue no matter what game engine you choose. Even if you implement something like DRM in an attempt to prevent piracy/hacking, it would likely be cracked (as what happens with AAA games).

    Additionally, something to remember is that stealing a game and selling it as your own is illegal anyway, so if this occurs you can pursue legal recourse, like contacting the platform the game is hosted on and asking them to remove it, issuing a takedown request, etc. (Disclaimer: I am not a lawyer though! Please take my advice with a grain of salt and consult legal professionals if you want to know what you can and cannot do with legal stuff like this)

    I really wouldn't worry too much about it at this stage anyway, as by the time you get a game closer to release, you will likely have some ideas on what you want to do to tackle the issue of piracy. Additionally, those who would pirate/steal your game are unlikely to buy it anyway (hence why they are stealing), so there is that to consider too, as putting in complicated ways to stop them could be more obtrusive to your non-stealing users than it stops stealing ones.
    Ultimately though, the issue of piracy would be a problem no matter what game engine you choose, whether its Godot or a big name game engine.


    Hopefully this helps answer your questions and concerns!

  • AlequeAleque Posts: 2Member

    @TwistedTwigleg said:
    Hopefully this helps answer your questions and concerns!

    This helped me a lot, thank you so much!

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